May 29, 2021

Bellingham WA: Public Meeting - June 3, 2021 re CityView project

Please see Dick Conoboy's update at NWCitizen.com - 

The notice from the City is as follows:

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Aven, Heather M. <haven@cob.org>
Date: Fri, May 28, 2021, 10:49 PM
Subject: Public Meeting - June 3, 2021
To:


Good Evening,

 

You are receiving this courtesy email because you have provided public comment on the proposed CityView project. On June 3rd at 7 pm via Zoom (see attachment for meeting link), the Planning Commission will hold a public meeting on this project. 

 

The materials being reviewed by the Commission are posted to meetings.cob.org. Public comments may continue to be submitted to planningcommission@cob.org at any time. Please see the attachment for more information on how to provide comments prior to and during the meeting. 

 

More information on this project can be found here:

 

Thank you for your interest in this process. Please let me know if you'd like to be removed from this mailing list.

 

 

Heather Aven – Administrative Assistant

City of Bellingham  - 360-778-8345 - haven@cob.org

My incoming and outgoing email messages are subject to public disclosure requirements per RCW 42.56.

 


May 27, 2021

Global: Does the latest conservation news ever get you down?

 

May 25, 2021

USA: Help Save Whales From Ship Strikes


----- Forwarded message ----
From: Kierán Suckling, Center for Biological Diversity <bioactivist@biologicaldiversity.org>
Date: Tue, May 25, 2021, 4:31 AM
Subject: Help Save Whales From Ship Strikes
To:
We've taken legal action to stop speeding ships from killing endangered whales.
Center for    Biological    Diversity   
 
Give Now »

Whale

The bodies of a mother fin whale and her calf were found earlier this month on the hull of a destroyer off the San Diego coast.

Navy training in the Pacific harms and disrupts marine mammals millions of times every year — and its fast-moving vessels plow down endangered whales.

Business as usual is killing off whales one by one, which is why we've launched or filed four legal actions this year to protect them.

You can help us fight for whales and other wildlife with a donation to the Saving Life on Earth Fund. There are just days left to double your gift.

Ship strikes are a leading killer of endangered blue, fin and humpback whales off the Pacific coast.

Federal records document at least 26 whales killed by vessel strikes along the West Coast from 2014 through 2018. Scientists say the actual number could be 20 times greater.

And 11 dead whales have washed ashore in the San Francisco Bay Area since early April, with at least four — including an endangered juvenile fin whale — likely killed by vessel strikes.

It's not just fin and humpback whales off the Pacific coast, either. In 2020, two of only 10 baby whales born to critically endangered Atlantic right whales during the 2019–2020 calving season were killed or seriously injured by vessel strikes off the coasts of Florida and New Jersey.

For whales to survive, we must stop ships from speeding unnecessarily across the parts of our oceans where these majestic animals spend time.

So just days ago we launched a lawsuit to force the National Marine Fisheries Service and U.S. Navy to work together to protect marine wildlife.

This joins other legal actions against the government for its heartbreaking failure to keep speeding ships from killing endangered whales.

It's simple: Speed limits for ships will lead to fewer whale deaths. We must give whales and other marine mammals safer passage in their essential habitat areas.

We can keep whales safe and thriving, but we need you with us.

Please make a matched gift by May 31 to the Saving Life on Earth Fund. There's truly no time to waste.

For the wild,

Kierán Suckling

Kierán Suckling
Executive Director
Center for Biological Diversity

 

P.S. Monthly supporters who give steady gifts of $10 or $20 sustain the Center's fight for wildlife. Do your part by starting a monthly donation.

  
Donate now to support the Center's work.      Opt out of mail list.
Photo of humpback whale from Shutterstock.
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Center for Biological Diversity
P.O. Box 710
Tucson, AZ 85702
United States


Apr 13, 2021

Online: From NhRP - New vegan innovation by our corporate partner Hourglass 💋🙋🐘🐞

----- Forwarded message -----
From: Nonhuman Rights Project <info@nonhumanrights.org>
Date: Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 11:01 AM
Subject: New vegan innovation by our corporate partner Hourglass
To:

The NhRP congratulates our cruelty-free corporate partner Hourglass Cosmetics for the launch of their 100% vegan red lipstick. Confession Red 0 is formulated with their patent-pending replacement for carmine—the beauty industry's standard red pigment produced from crushed female insects.   

It can take up to 1,000 crushed female cochineal beetles to create the vibrant red hue in a typical tube of lipstick. Through several years of research and development, Hourglass has innovated on the beauty staple as part of its ongoing commitment to protect nonhuman beings.

The cruelty-free luxury beauty brand has been a corporate partner of the Nonhuman Rights Project since 2017. While at first glance, our partnership may seem unlikely, it is rooted in a deep mutual commitment to protecting animals from harm caused by human beings and human institutions. Both the NhRP and Hourglass employ bold strategies for changing a status quo that views and treats nonhuman animals as "things." We are aligned in our perseverance against perceived obstacles to achieving the changes we seek and hope to inspire our supporters and fans to join us in seeking them.

Since the start of our partnership, Hourglass has donated 1% of all profits from their online store to the NhRP. Of their cruelty-free mission, Hourglass says, "We will continue working towards change because we believe in seeing eye to eye with animals ... We will stay true to our mission until they are protected in the beauty industry and beyond."

Shop Hourglasscomestics.com and they will donate 1% of profits to the NhRP. 

If you'd like to learn more about our partnership with Hourglass or if you run or work for an organization that is interested in supporting the NhRP's unique and vital mission through partnership, please reach out to me at msuzuki@nonhumanrights.org.

Thank you,
Mickey Suzuki
Development Director, the NhRP

Working for the recognition and protection of fundamental rights for nonhuman animals.

The Nonhuman Rights Project
5195 NW 112th Terrace
Coral Springs, FL 33076
United States

info@nonhumanrights.org

Click here to unsubscribe.




Mar 31, 2021

USA: Help Get Cyanide Bombs Out of the Wild

Black bear

----- Forwarded message ----
From: Kierán Suckling, Center for Biological Diversity <bioactivist@biologicaldiversity.org>
Date: Tue, Mar 30, 2021, 4:32 AM
Subject: Help Get Cyanide Bombs Out of the Wild
To: 
We won't stop fighting for a nationwide ban of M-44 cyanide bombs.
Center for    Biological    Diversity   
 
Give Now »

Black bear


A black bear in the wild is lured by a sweet scent — then triggers a device that sprays lethal poison into its face.

This fate befell more than 7,500 animals last year, including five dogs and dozens of foxes.

All because the killing program known as Wildlife Services continues to slaughter animals with devices called M-44s.

Please help end the use of these cyanide bombs with a gift to the Stop Wildlife Services Fund.

Of the animal deaths Wildlife Services caused in 2020 using M-44s, 218 were unintentional.

These devices are vicious and indiscriminate in their killing, leaving a gruesome trail of suffering and death in their wake.

Their slaughter of wildlife is cruel and unacceptable — and we're fighting to stop it.

In response to a 2017 lawsuit brought by the Center, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agreed to analyze impacts of M-44s on endangered wildlife by the end of this year.

But under the Trump administration, the Environmental Protection Agency denied a petition asking for a nationwide ban on cyanide traps.

As we continue to work toward that ban, we'll go county by county, state by state to get M-44s out of the wild.

We've already won restrictions in Idaho and Wyoming — and we're encouraged that the number of animals killed by cyanide bombs decreased in 2020.

But there's much more to do, because there's no justification for ever using M-44s to kill wild creatures.

We won't ever stop our legal actions to get them out of the Wildlife Services' arsenal.

You can help with a gift to the Stop Wildlife Services Fund today.

For the wild,

Kierán Suckling

Kierán Suckling
Executive Director
Center for Biological Diversity

 

P.S. Monthly supporters who give steady gifts of $10 or $20 sustain the Center's fight for wildlife. Do your part by starting a monthly donation.

 Photo of black bear from NPS
0-0-0-0
Center for Biological Diversity
P.O. Box 710
Tucson, AZ 85702
United States